Even manginas like cartoons


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21 February 2006

littlelulu.jpg

Between 1938 and 1961 there was some American cartoon strip called Little Lulu, and in 1995 an animated series was made, all with the theme of Lulu and her girlie mates always getting one over on the boys.

The reason I give this tiny little bit of comic history is to bring you to an article by an uber-mangina:

Everybody’s Favorite Juvenile Feminist:
She’s 7 Years Old and 70 Years Young!

Basically, this is a man (supposedly anyway) who applauds and loves this cartoon. Aside from the fact that a man who likes cartoons aimed at pre-teens is a bit, well, odd, he seems to relish the “girls are better than boys” theme, and spouts forth the insane rubbish one expects from a hairy feminist.

For example:

I have no use for “political correctness”–make no mistake about that–but I’ve always (as a boy and as a man) found something irresistible in the “Girls are smart” theme as used in children’s media.

Right. Do you now.

Compared with the present, that was a period of what you’d call “extreme sexism”. Women were considered dumb, they couldn’t get decent jobs, and so on.

Um…women are still considered pretty dumb, the primary reason for this belief being that women fell for feminism, which is a pretty stupid thing to do. Also, many women still can’t get decent jobs, despite having all this Sex Discrimination rubbish and positive discrimination/affirmative action.

And yet, at the same time, the “smart girls/stupid boys” story was a tidbit loved by children everywhere, boys included.

Maybe loved by girls everywhere, but not loved by boys. Well, maybe manginas-in-training, but not normal, healthy boys.

I guess children just knew that society’s male-superior model was artificial, and that the real world was much closer to that of Lulu’s (and their own) streets and playgrounds than to the “theoretical world” shown to them by the other media and by the schools.

What world does this guy live in? One where women are superior? Some alternate dimension where all the great philosophers, artists, leaders, inventors and scientists were women and all men ever did was sit about whinging about how oppressed they were? Where girls were superior in the streets and playgrounds?

He must have got his arse kicked by girls as a kid basically, and likes to think that that is what happened to every boy.

He gives a guide to some of these cartoons he loves so much:

From Hero to Zero (1952)
Tubby hopes to win Gloria’s heart by becoming a hero. He goes rowing with Lulu and arranges for her to get stranded in the boat without oars so he can “rescue” her in front of spectators. Botching the plan, he ends up stranded in the boat himself and in danger of going over the waterfall and getting killed. Lulu becomes the hero by saving HIM.

That could fucking pass for any cartoon, programme or movie these days, it’s all the same girls-are-great, boys-are-shit.

He likes this similar rubbish too.

What is most bizarre is that this guy’s favourite cartoon is South Park! That’s what his main site is about. Which is odd because one episode of South Park had a great parody of the Girls Vs. Boys theme involving a sled race; not only do the boys win the race but the girls fall screaming off a cliff and are savaged by wild bears.

In fact, his manginaness shows through in his writings on South Park, such as this bizarre piece of fan fiction where he explains that it’s partly biographical:

When I was 7, growing up in a little Podunk mountain town, a girl used this trick successfully to get even with a boy who had done something mean to her. I was one of her “pawns”. That was my first lesson about how smart girls can be, and that’s why I never forgot it.

That’s not “smart” that’s fucking manipulative and in any normal healthy boy it would inspire mistrust and contempt for the bitch and certainly the mental resolve to avoid getting manipulated by a female again. Not fucking admiration for them!

posted by Duncan Idaho @ 9:40 PM

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